April 18, 2016

Hasselblad H6D

Hasselblad has announced its newest camera, the H6D. Verge creative director James Bareham — a veteran photographer and former Hasselblad 2000 Series user — spent some time with it in our studio, and spoke to Hasselblad CEO Perry Oosting to find out just why someone might want to spend $27,000 on a camera. […]

Phil Tippett is the Oscar-winning stop-motion animator and designer behind some of the greatest fantasy creatures and sci-fi set pieces in cinema history. From his humble beginnings as an alien patron in the iconic Cantina sequence from ‘Star Wars: A New Hope’, to pioneering stop-motion techniques used throughout ‘Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘Return of the Jedi’, to seamlessly merging practical animation and CGI in Jurassic Park and beyond. In ‘My Life in Monsters’, VICE chronicles Tippett’s legendary life work, illustrating the process behind his greatest creations, the emotional hardships of transitioning into Hollywood’s digital revolution, and completing his return-to-form, stop-motion opus with the brutal, dystopian ‘Mad God’.

January 11, 2016

Evolution of the Dolly Zoom

The Dolly Zoom is a camera shot made famous in Alfred Hitchcock’s VERTIGO (1958). It was invented by cameraman Irmin Roberts to visually convey the feeling of agoraphobia by zooming in with the lens while simultaneously dollying backwards the entire camera…or vice versa.

When the Dolly Zoom shot is used in conjunction with an unsettling or emotional moment…the viewer is swept up in a visceral visual that represents the pain/confusion/anguish occurring in the story. Here are 23 classic film examples of this technique in chronological order. I’ve also included the shot before or after the Dolly Zoom so it can be seen in context of the scene…and not as just a trick shot.

READ FULL ARTICLE here: vashivisuals.com/evolution-dolly-zoom/